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05.19.2014

Ertharin Cousin (JD '82) named to 2014 TIME 100 Most Influential People

In a quote with The Telegraph, Ertharin Cousin says her mission statement is “to end hunger in my lifetime. We have the tools, the technology, the commitment at a global level from donor countries.” She has used this mission statement to guide her path through life.

Cousin is the 12th executive director of the U.N. World Food Programme. As the world’s largest humanitarian organization, it staffs approximately 13,500 people serving more than 90 million beneficiaries in 80 countries. The vision of WFP is “a world in which every man, woman, and child has access at all times to the food needed for an active and healthy life. Without food, there can be no sustainable peace, no democracy and no development.”

Cousin received her bachelor’s degree from University of Illinois at Chicago and her law degree from the University of Georgia. In particular, she studied international law under former U.S. Secretary of State Dean Rusk. After earning her law degree, Cousin worked in Illinois as Assistant Attorney General and then worked in several roles for the Democratic National Committee and the Clinton Administration.

Her passion for feeding the world led to work with several important organizations. As the lead government communications and community affairs chair for Albertsons Foods and Jewell Foods, she also served as president of the company’s corporate foundation, managing the organization’s philanthropic activities. She then served as executive vice president and chief operating officer of Feeding America (formerly America’s Second Harvest). In this position, she led the organization’s response to Hurricane Katrina and helped raise annual revenue from $20 million to $56 million.

Noticing Cousin’s dedication to combating global hunger, President Obama nominated and the U.S. Senate confirmed her as the US Ambassador to the UN Agencies for Food & Agriculture and head of the US Mission to the UN Agencies in Rome in 2009. She became a fierce advocate for programs that would promote country-led sustainable agriculture and a transition from relief to development.

The combination of these life experiences and wealth of knowledge led to Cousin’s appointment as executive director of the WFP. She was recently acknowledged as one of the 2014 TIME 100 Most Influential People and #49 in Forbes Magazine’s List of the World’s 100 Most Powerful Women. She is a published author and accomplished speaker on food insecurity and chronic malnutrition.

Thank you for being an incredible alumna, Ertharin! Your work fighting global hunger is an inspiration to us all, and we look forward to hearing even more about your accomplishments.

Click here to donate to the United Nations World Food Programme.

Photo credit to Laura Hynd

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12.19.2014

40 Under 40 honoree to direct UGA’s state government relations

Tobin R. "Toby" Carr (BBA '01, BSAE '01) was named associate vice president for government relations and director of state governmental relations at UGA. Vice President for Government Relations J. Griffin Doyle announced the appointment of Carr, who currently is planning director for the Georgia Department of Transportation.

Carr was appointed to his current DOT post in 2012, a position in which he has led a team of some 30 planning professionals in guiding strategic planning and project budget documents that direct state and federal resources to fund transportation projects. He graduated from the UGA Honors Program in 2001 with bachelor's degrees in business administration and agricultural engineering. Before assuming his DOT post, Carr served as Deal's transportation policy adviser and the governor's liaison to the Georgia House of Representatives. He previously was director of Deal's gubernatorial transition committee.

An active student leader while at UGA, Carr served as president of the Interfraternity Council and was named to Sphinx, Omicron Delta Kappa, Blue Key, Mortar Board, Phi Kappa Phi and the Arch Society. He currently serves on the UGA College of Engineering Alumni Advisory Board and was recognized in 2014 as a UGA 40 Under 40 and as the 2012 Blue Key Outstanding Young Alumnus Award winner.

"I'm humbled and thrilled to serve my alma mater in this role," Carr said. "I'm very grateful to Gov. Deal for his support of this new endeavor and to President Morehead and Vice President Doyle for giving me the opportunity to advance the mission of UGA."

Carr will serve as primary liaison between the university and state government officials, representing the university in all matters involving legislators, agencies, departments, and the other higher education institutions of Georgia. The transition will occur in early January.

Click here to read more. 

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12.11.2014

UGA’s Thank-a-Teacher Program

Did a teacher at UGA enrich your life or create a spark that inspired you to pursue your dreams? Was there a professor or teaching assistant that pushed you to do your best and helped you discover your passion for a certain subject? 

Now is the time to let that teacher - and the university community - know how grateful you are for their effect on your life. UGA's Center for Teaching and Learning invites current UGA students and alumni to particpate in the Thank-a-Teacher program.

What is Thank-a-Teacher? It is a program that allows students and alumni to express gratitude for teachers who have impacted their lives in a profound and meaningful way. If a teacher (professor, instructor, teaching assistant) made a positive contribution to your experience at UGA, please consider sending them a brief note. You may choose to remain anonymous or have your name attached to the note. 

You will be asked to fill out a simple form and acknowledge your appreciation for your teacher's work, dedication and extra effort. Share a simple thank you or an anecdote to let that teacher know what you enjoyed about their class and why it was important to you. 

Click here to complete the Thank-a-Teacher form

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12.10.2014

Former UGA football player gives back to the community

In recent years, the Lumpkin Street School in Hawkinsville, Georgia, one of 500 Georgia equalization schools built for African-American students during segregation, has fallen into disrepair. The town’s Deacons and Stewards Association wants to turn the space into a community center and museum, and a former Georgia football player is helping to make that happen.

Charles Johnson (M ’08), through the Charles Johnson Foundation (CJF), has issued a $25,000 challenge grant to renovate the school. The challenge, which states that CFJ will donate $25,000 to match the $25,000 that the Deacons and Stewards Association raises, has been instrumental in gaining donations for the project from other organizations.

Charles Johnson teaches a basketball clinic in his hometown of Hawkinsville, Georgia, during the Charles Johnson Foundation’s annual Community Weekend.

This isn’t the first time Charles Johnson has helped out his hometown. The captain for the Carolina Panthers has donated funds to support Parent Cafes for single mothers, sponsored women to attend the Pulaski Tomorrow program, donated to other middle Georgia foundations, and has provided scholarships to Pulaski County students during his organization’s annual Community Weekend in Hawkinsville.

For more information about the Lumpkin Street School project and how you can help, please email Greg Brown

Thank you for helping preserve the history of Georgia, Charles! The UGA Alumni Association is proud of your accomplishments on and off the field.

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