UGA Alumni Association:



Remembering and Celebrating Excellent UGA Graduates

One of the toughest aspects of my position is being notified when one of our graduates passes away.  However, it provides a opportunity to remember and celebrate the lives of these amazing individuals.  Our thoughts are with their families and loved ones.  

In memorium:

Richard Acree, president of Acree Oil Company and owner of the Hasty Mart of Georgia and Hasty Mart of South Carolina convenience store chain, passed away Sunday, June 2, at the age of 86.

Acree and his wife Emily Wynne Edwards Acree were among the first recipients of the University of Georgia's Pinnacle Award for generous and continuing donations to the University's Terry College of Business. Acree retired with emeritus status from the University Foundation Board of Directors.

Virginia Davis Shockley, known as Jenny, passed away Saturday, June 1 from complications of Alzheimer’s at 90. Shockley’s family and friends adored her as one of the most caring and helpful people around.

Born in Pocataligo, approximately 20 miles northeast of Athens, Jenny Shockley grew up in Winterville, just outside of Athens. She graduated from high school when she was 15 and went to UGA, where she graduated in 1943 with a bachelor’s degree in business. The next year, she joined the Navy WAVES, the acronym for Women Accepted for Volunteer Emergency Service.

Norman Herz passed away on May 28, 2013 at 90 years old. Herz pioneered the use of science to solve archaeological problems. The Archaeological Institute of America honored him in 1995 with its highest award in the field, The Pomerance Award for Scientific Contributions to Archaeology. Also, he won the UGA Creative Research Medal in 1981.

In 1970 he was appointed Professor and Department Head of the Geology Department at UGA, until his retirement in 1995. He then received the title of Professor Emeritus of Geology and Head Emeritus of the Department of Geology, University of Georgia.

Herz is the author or co-editor of many books on the topic of scientific methods as applied to archaeology plus over two hundered geological and archaeological articles including some of the earliest contributions to the theory of Plate Tectonics.

Joe Tereshinski, the first of three generations to play football at the UGA passed away on Sunday, June 9 at 89 years old. Tereshinski played tight end and defensive end on Bulldogs teams that won the national title 1942 and SEC titles in both 1942 and 1946. He then played eight seasons with the NFL’s Washington Redskins.

Tereshinski’s sons, Wally and Joe Tereshinski Jr., both played for Georgia in the mid-70s. Tereshinski Jr., the team’s current director of strength and conditioning, has been on staff since since 1982. Grandson Joe Tereshinski III opened the 2006 season as the starting quarterback, but was injured in the second game of the season. He is now an assistant coach for UNC Charlotte.

Charles M. Hudson Jr. passed away at the age of 80 in his Frankfort, Ky., home on June 8, 2013.

Charles was one of the world's leading scholars on the early history of the native peoples of the American South. He published 16 books, the best known of which are "The Southeastern Indians" and "Knights of Spain, Warriors of the Sun: Hernando de Soto and the South's Ancient Chiefdoms." Most recently he penned historical novels, including "The Cow-Hunter," which will be published in 2014 by the University of South Carolina Press.

In 1963, he joined the faculty of UGA and retired in 2000 as Professor Emeritus of Anthropology & History. Charles was beloved by family and friends for his twinkling eyes, his gentleness and humor, his sharp intellect, his unwavering honesty, and the love and appreciation he characteristically had for the people around him.

On June 15, 2013 Dr. Thomas George Roberts passed away in his home in New Market, AL. He was a rare mixture of great intelligence and education wrapped in the humility of someone who realized the limits of knowledge and human understanding. His passion for life, learning, and decency earned him the respect of his peers, family, and friends.

Tom had a B.S. and M.S. in Physics from the University of Georgia and earned his Ph. D. from the North Carolina State University at Raleigh. Perhaps Malcolm Forbes best described Tom's view of life, learning and education: "Education's purpose is to replace an empty mind with an open one." Tom was always eager to explore, learn, and debate. He would often say that he would be happy to debate any topic and then ask, "which side do you want?" In his own words he "may not be right but he is always certain."

Andy J. Olsen passed away on April 25 in Chamblee at 76. In 1964 Olsen earned his masters degree in Science Education at the University of Georgia. After a brief teaching stint at the University of Southern Mississippi at Hattiesburg, he returned to help bring the newly established Fernbank Science Center to life.

As the assistant director for physical sciences, Olsen was responsible for helping grow the center’s education programs, acquiring museum subjects, and even took a trip to Europe to gain ideas for Fernbank’s planetarium. Olsen was working for the museum in 1969, when world’s eyes turned on Fernbank’s one-of-a-kind telescope as it broadcasted the launch of Apollo 11 mission, the first to put humans on the moon.

In 1972, the DeKalb school board hired Olsen as their public relations officer, the first in the state. He navigated the federally mandated desegregation effort in the 70s and 80s. Olsen believed in equal opportunities for all students, regardless of race, and he worked hard to help others believe it, too.

Donald Dean Hankinson Sr., 76, of Fayetteville passed away June 14. In 1956 he won a 3A Georgia high school singles championship and later played one year each on the University of Georgia and Georgia State tennis teams. In 1965 he was president of the Atlanta Lawn Tennis Association.

Following his college days, Hankinson was in the business of fun and took great enjoyment in it. In 1959 he founded Phoenix Amusements Inc., a one-man Atlanta operation that grew to have customers nationwide. Nowadays his company provides entertainment equipment — both classic and state-of-the-art electronic games, simulators, pinball machines, etc. — for corporate clients such as Google, Shell Oil and Hewlett Packard to use in their marketing tours and trade shows.

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Alumna Spotlight: Emily Scofield (MS '99)

Emily Scofield (MS '99) published her first book, Coco & Dean: Explorers of the World, in April. The book is the first in a series of adventures Scofield is writing to educate children about environmental awareness. Scofield is the executive director for the U.S. Green Building Council's North Carolina Chapter. She leads members, volunteers and staff members across the state to promote sustainable construction practices under the Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) program. In the past few years, she has been named to the UGA Alumni Association's 40 Under 40 Class of 2013, and was a Charlotte Top Woman in Business in 2014.

Scofield lives in North Carolina with her husband, Tom, and their two children. She is an avid volunteer in the community working with organizations such as the American Heart Association, Providence United Methodist Church, Calvary Child Development Center, Communities in Schools and Habitat for Humanity.

Coco & Dean: Explorers of the World takes readers on three adventures with Coco and Dean. Readers learn how to conserve resources, the benefits of recycling and the importance of keeping oceans clean. Scofield exposes complex topics like ‘carbon footprints’ and ‘renewable resources' through each adventure. Not only is the reader engaged in learning about these topics in the story, there are study questions and links to environmental organizations in each chapter. 

The UGA Alumni Association is proud of this Bulldog and the work she is doing to improve the world around her! 

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Drumroll, please ... announcing the 2016 Bulldog 100!

The UGA Alumni Association is pleased to reveal the 2016 Bulldog 100! Bulldog 100 celebrates the 100 fastest-growing Bulldog businesses owned or operated by UGA alumni. This year, the university is excited to not only unveil a new group of honorees, but a new logo for the Bulldog 100 program - check it out!

The 2016 Bulldog 100 includes businesses of all sizes and from industries such as veterinary medicine, IT consulting and pest control. Several areas of the country are represented, including companies from as far north as New York and as far west as California. Of the 100 businesses, 80 are located within the state of Georgia, and only two business have made the list all seven years: Mom Corps and Vino Venue/Atlanta Wine School.

The ranked Bulldog 100 list will be revealed at the awards celebration on Saturday, January 30 at the Atlanta Marriott Marquis. Registration for this event will open soon.

The awards ceremony will feature a keynote address by Jeff Dunn, CEO and president of C-Fresh, a division of Campbell Soup Company that includes Bolthouse Farms, Campbell’s retail fresh soup unit, and Garden Fresh Gourmet. Dunn earned a bachelor’s degree in 1980 from UGA’s Terry College of Business.

Please view the complete list and congratulate the honorees on social media using #Bulldog100

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UGA to launch inclusive, post-secondary education program in 2017

Students with intellectual or developmental disabilities will soon be able to enjoy the full UGA experience with the launch of a new inclusive post-secondary education program, Destination Dawgs, beginning in spring 2017.

The program, housed within the College of Family and Consumer Sciences' Institute on Human Development and Disability, aims to assist those students' transition into adulthood by fully immersing them in UGA life.

Destination Dawgs, still in development, aspires to have students reside in on-campus housing, audit classes and be supported by peer mentors who will assist the students in courses and on campus to improve their independent living skills.

"The goal is for Destination Dawgs participants to come out of the program with a platform for getting a good job and for leading a good adult life," said Carol Britton Laws, an assistant clinical professor and coordinator of UGA's Disability Studies Certificate program within the institute. "The unemployment rate for people with disabilities nationally is about 75 percent, and we're trying to help students build skills and gain experiences that are marketable."

Laws envisions a five-semester model with a small cohort of five students enrolling in the program in spring 2017.

Because students won't enter the program through the regular admissions process, they will receive a certificate of completion rather than a degree.

The emphasis on developing and expanding post-secondary education opportunities in the state can be traced back to the founding of the Georgia Inclusive Postsecondary Education Consortium in 2011, which seeks to create opportunities for students who historically have not had access to postsecondary educational opportunities. The consortium is partly funded by the Georgia Council on Developmental Disabilities.

"What's changing is that the students we have here now are what we call the ADA generation," she said. "They're the first generation of Americans born after the passage of the Americans with Disabilities Act in 1990, and due to that and other legislation, they grew up with peers with intellectual differences in their classrooms to a greater extent than any of us did."

Acknowledging disability is really about understanding diversity, Laws said.

"Disability is just one characteristic that is possible in human beings, but it is often a characteristic that is used to discriminate against a person or to limit their opportunities," Laws said. "FACS has created a plan to increase the diversity of students within the college, and this program will fit with that."

Continue reading this story.

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