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07.02.2013

Remembering and Celebrating Excellent UGA Graduates

One of the toughest aspects of my position is being notified when one of our graduates passes away.  However, it provides a opportunity to remember and celebrate the lives of these amazing individuals.  Our thoughts are with their families and loved ones.  

In memorium:

Richard Acree, president of Acree Oil Company and owner of the Hasty Mart of Georgia and Hasty Mart of South Carolina convenience store chain, passed away Sunday, June 2, at the age of 86.

Acree and his wife Emily Wynne Edwards Acree were among the first recipients of the University of Georgia's Pinnacle Award for generous and continuing donations to the University's Terry College of Business. Acree retired with emeritus status from the University Foundation Board of Directors.


Virginia Davis Shockley, known as Jenny, passed away Saturday, June 1 from complications of Alzheimer’s at 90. Shockley’s family and friends adored her as one of the most caring and helpful people around.

Born in Pocataligo, approximately 20 miles northeast of Athens, Jenny Shockley grew up in Winterville, just outside of Athens. She graduated from high school when she was 15 and went to UGA, where she graduated in 1943 with a bachelor’s degree in business. The next year, she joined the Navy WAVES, the acronym for Women Accepted for Volunteer Emergency Service.


Norman Herz passed away on May 28, 2013 at 90 years old. Herz pioneered the use of science to solve archaeological problems. The Archaeological Institute of America honored him in 1995 with its highest award in the field, The Pomerance Award for Scientific Contributions to Archaeology. Also, he won the UGA Creative Research Medal in 1981.

In 1970 he was appointed Professor and Department Head of the Geology Department at UGA, until his retirement in 1995. He then received the title of Professor Emeritus of Geology and Head Emeritus of the Department of Geology, University of Georgia.

Herz is the author or co-editor of many books on the topic of scientific methods as applied to archaeology plus over two hundered geological and archaeological articles including some of the earliest contributions to the theory of Plate Tectonics.


Joe Tereshinski, the first of three generations to play football at the UGA passed away on Sunday, June 9 at 89 years old. Tereshinski played tight end and defensive end on Bulldogs teams that won the national title 1942 and SEC titles in both 1942 and 1946. He then played eight seasons with the NFL’s Washington Redskins.

Tereshinski’s sons, Wally and Joe Tereshinski Jr., both played for Georgia in the mid-70s. Tereshinski Jr., the team’s current director of strength and conditioning, has been on staff since since 1982. Grandson Joe Tereshinski III opened the 2006 season as the starting quarterback, but was injured in the second game of the season. He is now an assistant coach for UNC Charlotte.


Charles M. Hudson Jr. passed away at the age of 80 in his Frankfort, Ky., home on June 8, 2013.

Charles was one of the world's leading scholars on the early history of the native peoples of the American South. He published 16 books, the best known of which are "The Southeastern Indians" and "Knights of Spain, Warriors of the Sun: Hernando de Soto and the South's Ancient Chiefdoms." Most recently he penned historical novels, including "The Cow-Hunter," which will be published in 2014 by the University of South Carolina Press.

In 1963, he joined the faculty of UGA and retired in 2000 as Professor Emeritus of Anthropology & History. Charles was beloved by family and friends for his twinkling eyes, his gentleness and humor, his sharp intellect, his unwavering honesty, and the love and appreciation he characteristically had for the people around him.


On June 15, 2013 Dr. Thomas George Roberts passed away in his home in New Market, AL. He was a rare mixture of great intelligence and education wrapped in the humility of someone who realized the limits of knowledge and human understanding. His passion for life, learning, and decency earned him the respect of his peers, family, and friends.

Tom had a B.S. and M.S. in Physics from the University of Georgia and earned his Ph. D. from the North Carolina State University at Raleigh. Perhaps Malcolm Forbes best described Tom's view of life, learning and education: "Education's purpose is to replace an empty mind with an open one." Tom was always eager to explore, learn, and debate. He would often say that he would be happy to debate any topic and then ask, "which side do you want?" In his own words he "may not be right but he is always certain."


Andy J. Olsen passed away on April 25 in Chamblee at 76. In 1964 Olsen earned his masters degree in Science Education at the University of Georgia. After a brief teaching stint at the University of Southern Mississippi at Hattiesburg, he returned to help bring the newly established Fernbank Science Center to life.

As the assistant director for physical sciences, Olsen was responsible for helping grow the center’s education programs, acquiring museum subjects, and even took a trip to Europe to gain ideas for Fernbank’s planetarium. Olsen was working for the museum in 1969, when world’s eyes turned on Fernbank’s one-of-a-kind telescope as it broadcasted the launch of Apollo 11 mission, the first to put humans on the moon.

In 1972, the DeKalb school board hired Olsen as their public relations officer, the first in the state. He navigated the federally mandated desegregation effort in the 70s and 80s. Olsen believed in equal opportunities for all students, regardless of race, and he worked hard to help others believe it, too.


Donald Dean Hankinson Sr., 76, of Fayetteville passed away June 14. In 1956 he won a 3A Georgia high school singles championship and later played one year each on the University of Georgia and Georgia State tennis teams. In 1965 he was president of the Atlanta Lawn Tennis Association.

Following his college days, Hankinson was in the business of fun and took great enjoyment in it. In 1959 he founded Phoenix Amusements Inc., a one-man Atlanta operation that grew to have customers nationwide. Nowadays his company provides entertainment equipment — both classic and state-of-the-art electronic games, simulators, pinball machines, etc. — for corporate clients such as Google, Shell Oil and Hewlett Packard to use in their marketing tours and trade shows.

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07.30.2014

Former Bulldog Making “Chic Comfort Food” on MasterChef

Combining southern charm with a New York edge can be tricky, but former Bulldog, Elizabeth Cauvel (ABJ '04), has done just that in her time in the kitchen. Cauvel has stepped into the cooking spotlight as one of 30 contestants on season 5 of “MasterChef."

Known for tantalizing recipes and wild expressions, Cauvel is in the running for the coveted prize: a cookbook deal, $250,000 and the title of MasterChef. We caught up with Cauvel to see how she made the journey from Athens to Los Angeles for MasterChef.

Tell us a little about yourself, and how you came across joining this season of "MasterChef"?

I'm an Associate Creative Director at MRY, a digital and social advertising agency in New York. After graduating from UGA, I attended the Creative Circus, a creative advertising portfolio school in Atlanta. I started working in Chicago as a copywriter in 2007 and moved to New York in 2010.

I am a huge fan of MasterChef and while watching the show, I saw an ad for open auditions in New York. Despite the fact that auditions were a mere two weeks after my wedding, I decided to try out for the show. I brought homemade lasagna as my audition dish, and after making it through the initial rounds, I learned that I'd be flying to Los Angeles with the final 100 contestants. From there, we were narrowed down to a group of 30. I'm proud to say I'm still in the running and have won 6 individual competitions this season. 

What has been your greatest accomplishment as a chef so far during or outside of the show?

My greatest accomplishment since filming the show is being invited to Lexington to cook for a group of chefs and journalists with my MasterChef co-contestant and real life friend, Dan Wu. The meal was styled, photographed and hosted by Tiffany Mitchell, creator of www.offbeatandinspired.com. It was a huge honor to work with a talented content creator like Tiffany as well as work alongside a competitor and friend I deeply respect.

How did your time at UGA influence your interest in becoming a chef?

Living in Athens exposed me to cooking styles, ethnic cuisines and restaurants that I'd never had access to in my hometown. I tried new foods and started to expand my palate. I realized I loved experiencing different cuisines, which inspired me to dabble in the kitchen.

I started off slow, mostly cooking with pre-made ingredients, but soon learned to conceptualize dishes and follow basic recipes. As I began to learn practice, I experimented with cooking from scratch. Cooking brings me so much joy – I think I might actually be addicted to it! Cooking is meditative for me; it's truly my therapy. I want everyone to be able to experience the joy of cooking at home and sharing a meal with loved ones.

What is one of your favorite things to cook?

I love to cook pasta! I have been perfecting my lasagna recipe for about three years, and it got me on MasterChef, so I think it's pretty solid! I love making pasta from scratch and I'll spend an entire Saturday simmering a tomato sauce. I'm not Italian, but I still aspire to be an Italian grandma.

What are your plans for after the show is over?

I'm still working in advertising, but I'm also doing small catering gigs private dinners and events. I'm working on food photography, styling and writing, too. I blog about my cooking adventures and I frequently post food pictures on my Instagram account

Ultimately, my dream is to inspire people to cook at home, by showing them it’s easier and more accessible than they think. I'll go wherever that mission leads me.

With such passion for cooking, we expect Cauvel to go far in her culinary journey and wish her luck as she continues throughout the competition. To catch Cauvel in action, watch Season 5 of MasterChef on Monday nights at 8 p.m. on FOX. To find out more about her journey to the show watch her contestant video here.

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07.28.2014

Father and son share a bond like no other

Craig Sager Jr. (ABJ '10), a member of UGA's 2008-2009 football team, and his father, legendary sartorialist and NBA and MLB sports announcer, Craig Sager Sr., have always shared a love of sports. They now share an even stronger connection - a connection that helped save Craig Sr.'s life.

On July 3, Craig Jr. donated bone marrow to his father who is battling acute myeloid leukemia.

“I was pretty confident I’d be the match,” Craig Jr. said. “But 10 out of 10? That’s pretty crazy.”

Craig Jr. was disappointed, though, to find out the surgery would take place on July 3. Like many Georgians, Craig Jr. looks forward to running the annual Peachtree Road Race each Fourth of July. The race has always served as a bonding experience for the entire Sager family. This would have been the first time in 32 years that Craig Sr. has missed the race and Craig Jr. was looking forward to running in his 10th consecutive Peachtree Road Race.

Despite warnings from his doctors that he forego the race this year, Craig Jr. opted to run the race alongside his mother and sisters - in honor of his father.

Less than 24 hours after donating 1.5 liters of bone marrow to his father, Craig Jr. lined up at the starting line with thousands of other runners.

“I wasn’t supposed to be doing this race,” Craig Jr. said. “I was supposed to stay overnight in the hospital but I left at 6:00 p.m. and then just went to bed.”

In the end, Craig Jr. completed the 2014 Peachtree Road Race in one hour and 17 minutes. He was realistic about his finishing time and did not expect to match his previous time of 42 minutes.

Congratulations to Craig Jr. for bravely helping his father's leukemia battle and for crossing the Peachtree Road Race finish line for the 10th year in a row. Best wishes to the entire Sager family for a future of good health!

Information for this blog was sourced from the Atlanta Journal Constitution and MLB.com

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07.25.2014

UGA alumna is on fire

In 2006, Disney produced a huge hit with Cars. It was a family-friendly, fun-filled animated adventure that led to a sequel and the successful spin-off Planes. This summer, a related film will grace the silver screen, Planes: Fire and Rescue, and in it, a successful UGA alumna.

Corri English (ABJ ’00) is well-known in her field as the star of numerous films, guest on iconic television shows, and lead singer for country band Brokedown Cadillac. Though her career began when she was quite young, hosting children’s shows on TBS in the 1980s, it really took off after graduating from UGA.

English has made a name for herself in horror films, winning Best Actress at the International Horror and Sci-Fi Film Festival for her role in Unrest. She also generated quite a following for her voice-over work in popular video games such as Mass Effect 3, Dragon Age: Origins and  Star Wars: The Old Republic. These character voicing skills were brought to life during Planes: Fire and Rescue

Her character, Pinecone, along with four other smokejumpers, bravely leaps from planes to put out fires. "Working alongside actors like Dane Cook, Ed Harris, and Regina King was a great experience," said English. 

The alumna is excited about the release of the film and hopes it leads to further voice acting opportunities in the future. 

Truly, for this star Bulldog, the sky is the limit.

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