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02.28.2013

Georgia Chief Justice Harold G. Clarke (JD ’50) Passes Away

Harold G. Clarke (JD ’50) was appointed to the state Supreme Court in 1979 and became one of the most influential jurists in our state’s history. It is with a heavy heart that I share news today of his passing at the age of 85. Clarke, who had been under hospice care for a prolonged illness, was surrounded by family. My deepest sympathies go to his family members.

Clarke’s time on the bench was characterized by his challenging lawyers to improve their work, his stance against inequality in the court system, and his efforts to improve the state’s indigent defense system. He was called a liberal activist by some and refreshingly progressive by others. But all would agree he was a gentle and unassuming man.

During World War II, Clarke became editor of the Pacific Stars and Stripes for the U.S. Army. When the war concluded, he earned his JD from UGA and, two years later, married Athens-native Nora Gordon. The couple moved to Forsyth where Clarke began his law practice and became editor/publisher of his father’s newspaper, the Monroe Advertiser.

From 1961 to 1971, Clarke served in the Georgia House of Representatives. Five years later, he took over as president of the State Bar of Georgia. Three years after that, in 1979, Clark was appointed to the Georgia Supreme Court by former Governor George Busbee. By 1990, he was chief justice. He retired from the court in 1994.

The Georgia graduate led our state’s Supreme Court through what is arguably one of its most transformative periods. According to the AJC, “After Clarke became chief justice in 1990, the court added its first African-American and female justices. The court issued opinions that broadened the rights of free speech and expression, struck down death sentences, cracked down on overly aggressive prosecutors and expanded individual liberties.”

Beyond his good work on the bench, Clarke was known for being an all-around good man. In 1992, Clarke temporarily stepped aside as chief justice to allow his friend, Justice Charles Weltner, to serve his last few months of his life (he’d been battling cancer) as chief justice. The AJC reported that, “after his swearing-in ceremony, Weltner returned to his office and, courtesy of Clarke, found new stationery bearing his name as chief justice.” This illustrates the kindness this man showed to everyone he met.

On behalf of the University of Georgia Alumni Association, I want to extend my sympathies to the Clarke family. I’d also like to congratulate Harold on a life well-lived; his actions and demeanor were appreciated by all Georgians and by the Bulldog family.

Read an extensive feature on Harold G. Clarke from the Atlanta Journal-Constitution.

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05.01.2015

Bulldog Tartan!

Wondering what to give to a friend or family member graduating from the University of Georgia next week? Look no further than UGA's very own Scottish tartan.

Tartan's pattern of interlocking stripes, often mistaken for plaid, dates back to the third or fourth century A.D. Tartan became so popular in Scottish Highlands culture that commercial weavers began naming the patterns instead of numbering them. Over time, those names began to represent a connection between the wearer and Scottish clans.

Today, tartens can identify individuals as members of certain groups, now including the University of Georgia.

For UGA's tartan (modeled above by Student Alumni Council member Jasmine Johnson '16), UGA graduate Walter Estes (AB '77, MED '98) developed and donated a tartan design using red and black. The College of Family and Consumer Sciences then secured official recognition by the Scottish Register of Tartans. After approval, a student committee chose the neck tie for men and a silk scarf for women as the ideal products to first be developed from the tartan design. Today, there are several products to choose from, including a pocket square, bow tie, tote bag and cummerbund.

Click here to shop for official UGA tartan products - when you do, the royalties support scholarships and programs for FACS students in the Department of Textiles, Merchandising and Interiors!

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04.27.2015

Spotlight on UGA’s recent award recipients

Recently, UGA several faculty students have been in the spotlight for prestigious scholarships and awards. The UGA Alumni Association is proud of these outstanding award recipients and all that they do to further the university's mission and increase its reputation. 

Torre Lavelle '16 has been named a 2015 Morris K. Udall and Stewart L. Udall Foundation Scholar which is awarded to an undergraduate pursuing a career focused on environmental or Native American policy. Lavelle is a third-year student majoring in ecology and plans to pursue a master’s degree in environmental management as well as a Juris Doctor in hopes of becoming a conservation policymaker. Read more.

Juanita Johnson-Bailey (MED '93, EDD '94), director of the Institute for the Women’s Studies at UGA, is the recipient of the Eleanor Roosevelt Fund Award, an honor given by the American Association of University Women for outstanding contribution to equality and education for women and girls. Johnson-Bailey has authored and co-authored more than 100 journal articles, book reviews, book chapters and monographic. She has also delivered nearly 120 conference presentations and chaired nearly 30 completed doctoral dissertations. Read more.  

 

Kathleen Wilson '16 was named a 2015 Truman Scholar receiving a $30,000 scholarship toward graduate school. Wilson is currently pursuing a bachelor’s degree in economics and a bachelor’s degree in international affairs. She plans to continue her education by pursuing a master’s in public policy and Middle Eastern studies after graduation in 2016. Read more.

   

Megan Ernst '15 was awarded the James Madison Graduate Fellowship which provides up to $24,000 for individuals who desire to become outstanding teachers at the secondary school level. Ernst will graduate in May with Bachelor of Arts in journalism, Bachelor of Arts in political science, and a Master of Public Administration from SPIA. She plans to pursue a master’s degree in teaching from the UGA College of Education. Read more

Lauren Dennison '15, Erin Hollander '15, and Karishma Sriram '15 received 2015 Barry M. Goldwater Scholarships, the exclusive undergraduate scholarship in the field of mathematics, the natural sciences and engineering. The scholarships cover the cost of tuition, fees, books, and room and board up to a maximum of $7,500 per year. All three students are enrolled in Franklin College and plan to earn doctoral degrees related to biomedical research. Read more

Ayan Hussein (BS ’12) is one of the winners of the 2015 Paul and Daisy Soros Fellowship for New Americans. This fellowship supports the graduate education of students who were born abroad but have become permanent residents or naturalized citizens of the United States. Hussein, a 2012 UGA graduate, is now a Ph.D. student at Yale University studying biological and biomedical student. Selected from a pool of 1,200 applicants, she will receive tuition and stipend assistance of up to $90,000 in support of graduate education. Read more

Sixteen UGA students have been awarded the National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship. The highly competitive awards recognizes and supports outstanding graduate students in science, technology, engineering and mathematics disciplines.These fellows were selected from more than 16,000 applicants nationwide for the 2015 competition. Read more

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04.23.2015

Meet the UGA alumna behind the Georgia Trail Summit: Tracie Sanchez (AB '88, MPA '11)

The Georgia Trail Summit is excited to announce the schedule for its second annual event, which will take place in Athens, Georgia, June 4-6 at The Graduate. Continue reading to learn more about Georgia Trail Summit's founder, Double Dawg Tracie Sanchez (AB '88, MPA '11), and the inspiration behind this organization. 

I’ve been riding bikes, hiking mountains and paddling rivers all my life. Being on a trail makes for wonderful escapes, new adventures and challenges, new friends, staying healthy and connecting with nature. And great photo memories.

Earning my Masters of Public Administration at UGA late in life allowed me to focus on which public policy I wanted to champion. Being part of the effort to build a world-class network of connected trails in every corner of Georgia is a cause I believe in deeply.

The first thing I did as an undergrad in 1985 was sell my car and become a bicycle commuter to campus. I still had that bike 24 years later when I returned to UGA for my masters’ in public administration. I caught trail fever in Athens biking the greenway, helping the Firefly Trail incorporate as a non-profit, and collaborating on a graduate project in Hartwell that led to inventorying regional greenspaces with UGA landscape architecture students.

Clearly, alternative transportation solutions involving active living are my passion. Eight years at UGA as a program coordinator for the Leonard Leadership Scholars and one-on-one chats with mentor Earl Leonard taught me a thing or two about leading an effort. So with a background in graphic design, leadership development, a public policy degree, and spare time during the job search, I reached out to all the trail hounds I knew in Georgia, and began to build a network.

Research in 2011 revealed there are 82 trail and greenway projects proposed or underway in Georgia. I was familiar with many of them from my own explorations and serving as a mobility manager for a regional commission. I learned of others while attending Smart Growth conferences, Transportation Camp, the Georgia Bike Summit and transit and mobility workshops. But something was missing. No one knew about anyone else’s project; no one seemed to be sharing lessons learned. Why wasn’t there an easy opportunity to convene Georgia’s entire community of trail experts in one place? 

The Department of Natural Resources admitted they didn’t have staff capacity to update a 15-year-old comprehensive trail plan. With so much to learn from each other, I felt compelled to connect the dots…and the people.

  

The solution came when attending the National Bike Summit in DC. While visiting Rails-to-Trails Conservancy’s development director, Kelly Pack, she inspired me with great advice, “Round everyone up and hold a Georgia Trail Summit.”  I pitched the idea that spring and have been recruiting and collaborating with trail, greenway and blueway partners ever since. The time was right and I visualized myself as the champion for the effort. UGA taught me how and now I'm on a roll.

Today, I lead a dedicated team of volunteer trailblazers planning the second annual Georgia Trail Summit. So far, we’ve raised $20,000 with 35 sponsors, including UGA College of Public Health, UGA Office of Sustainability, UGA Warnell School of Forestry, Athens-Clarke County Leisure Services Department, Athens-Clarke County Mayor’s Office and Athens Convention & Visitors Bureau. More importantly, we're connecting people.

The Georgia Trail Summit has seen a drastic increase in presenters since its creation. You all know Athens is an ideal, walkable city with hotels right on the Greenway and other nearby trails for biking, hiking and paddling, which will be featured during 10 mobile workshops.

I remain committed to my vision for Georgia’s trail movement to grow into an established and influential organization helping non-profits, governments and communities focus on connectivity, conservation and comprehensive planning. 

UGA alumni are personally invited to attend this timely conversation on the future of Georgia’s trails June 4, 5 and 6 in Athens at the Graduate Hotel. For a closer look, stroll on over to georgiatrailsummit.com.

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